Guidelines & Policies

Submission Guidelines postScriptum: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Literary Studies ISSN: 2456-7507 is a bi-annual journal, published in the months of January …

Contact

Patron: Dr Sandip Kumar Basak, Principal, Sarat Centenary College <https://sccollegednk.ac.in>, Dhaniakhali, Sub-Division: Chinsurah, District: Hooghly, WB, India, PIN: 712302. e-Mail: principal_sccollegednk@rediffmail.com …

Archive

Volume I Number i & ii (January & July 2016) Volume II Number i & ii (January & July 2017) …

Current Issue (January 2019)

Volume IV Number i

Special Issue on

Transnational and Transcultural Spaces

Guest Editor

Dr Jati Sankar Mondal, Sidho-Kanho-Birsa University <skbu.ac.in>

 

 

Transcultural Literature, Nationalism and its Adequacy in World Literatures: Pedagogical Requirements

DOI

Keshav Nath <keshav.yuthya@gmail.com>, Manipal University

Abstract

This paper discusses that transcultural literary theories have been materialized through time, though its labeling and adequacy has been debatable. However, transcultural literature has now become significant with the issue of world literature. The present paper offers wide-ranging information of the collective worth of a transcultural perception in the genus of comparative literature and modern literary theories. This paper also analyzes the contemporary understanding of literatures across the globe and gives an indication on how transcultural kinds of literature can contribute to the development of societies.

Keywords

Transcultural literary studies, transcultural perception, modern interpretation, post-colonial theories, social prototypes

 

 

North Indian Classical Music and the West: The Journey from the Realm of Multicultural to Transcultural

DOI

Soumya Goswamy <nupurgoswamy@gmail.com>, Chandernagore College

Abstract

In popular and scholarly discourse, the term globalization is widely used to define the way things have shaped up in the contemporary world. The general agreement of the social scientists and researchers today hinges on the concept of a hybrid global culture. While the importance of this hybrid fabric becomes inevitable, cautious attention needs to be exercised towards the fact that the elements of hybridity do not become rigid constituents of an unaccommodating discourse. The inherent nature of this discourse on the one hand runs the risk of generating the constant urge on the part of the participants to modify and fit into this new and over-arching template, while on the other, its growing contemporary relevance might indulge in casting a shadow on the long history of give and take that have existed between cultures for a very long time. This paper suggests that cross-cultural encounters and mutual appropriations have been a regular feature even though they might have come with a cost. In order to have an empirical understanding of such transcultural processes the author has chosen to explore the encounters of North Indian classical music with the West. This is not simply about how Western or Indian musicians have used each other’s elements to give piquancy to their own creations; rather, it is about a wider issue how one culture perceives the cultural products of another and what grows out of it. Music, that most enigmatic form of human expression, seems a suitable subject for understanding this complex cultural process. The paper intends to investigate this by focusing on the experiences of two very eminent personalities, Vishnu Narayan Bhatkhande and Pandit Ravi Shankar whose contributions to their craft have been remarkable as well as controversial.

Keywords

Music, classical, modern, notation, hybridity, transcultural

 

 

Interrogating the Representation of ‘Transculturality’ in Gurinder Chadha’s It’s a Wonderful Afterlife

DOI

Jayati Ganguly <jganguly18rsl@gmail.com>, Bidhan Chandra College

Abstract

In view of increasing Globalization, Transnationalization and the growth of Transcultural spaces, it is important and interesting to study literature that encapsulates all the complexities of these phenomena. Issues like obliteration of cultural ‘Border’, analysing cultural complexities and the reshaping of hybrid realities of diaspora and globalization are becoming pertinent. This paper aims to study and interrogate such aspects in Gurinder Chadha’s film It’s a Wonderful Afterlife (2010). Chadha may be seen as a very relevant subject of study in the proposed context because of her own identity, especially as a diasporic filmmaker, and for the kind of movies she has made. Though aware of the nuanced concepts and theories of such contemporary fields of study, this paper draws mainly on the idea of ‘Transculturality’ as expounded by Wolfgang Welsch in his essay “Transculturality: The Puzzling Form of Cultures Today.” It can be noted that the cultural intertwinement portrayed in the movie amounts to a representation of ‘hybridity’, a near obliteration of cultural borders and that of the conflicts arising from such borders. The paper asserts this to be quite a representation of transculturality.  But through a deeper analysis of various representations in the film, it has been argued that despite the obliteration of stringent traditional cultural borders and an increasing globalized/transcultural existence, there emerges a latent ‘Orientalism’. This is a ‘Re-Orientalist’ attitude that betrays the latest efforts of restructuring the postcolonial discourse in the era of modern diaspora, hybridity, global citizenship, and transnationality/transculturality etc. This also questions the ideological perspectives of the filmmaker who makes efforts to transcend borders but, in a way (even if unconsciously), circulates re-orientalist discourses/prejudices and reinstates postcolonial binaries which emerge as dangerous gaps in the progressive processes of transculturality and globalization.

Keywords

Re-Orientalism, diaspora space, hybridity, transculturality

 

 

 

The Precarious Balance: Cultural Dilemma of Acculturation in Rohinton Mistry’s Tales from Firozsha Baag

DOI

Rituparna Das <iritu1993@gmail.com>, Jadavpur University

Abstract

Cultural identity and challenges of faith have constituted as well as created conflicts while reckoning with the forces of ethnic homogeneity for a stable society. A constant struggle to maintain faith in the light of religious doubt and formidable dangers of dislocation from one’s chosen place in a community problematizes an individual’s position while adjusting to the trends of progress. One such is being the Parsee community after their exodus in 7th century AD in the wake of Muslim onslaught. Often considered one of the most enterprising among minority communities, the Parsees have internalized a hybrid existence. Living between constant economic and political changes, conflicting philosophy of life and faith, they have displayed a strange acclimatization, both within the societies they have migrated to and simultaneously away from it. Like many Parsee writers, Rohinton Mistry’s nostalgic fiction addresses and seeks a preservation of this dubious positioning of an ethnic identity for his community. He has done it primarily through the effective medium of memory and imagination, remaining quite aware of the discernable drawbacks of living in Canada while basing his stories in Mumbai, where he spent a significant part of his youth. While cherishing the partial memories of his country (India), Mistry keeps on smoothening his inner self by writing about his community that forms the bridge between his own imagined motherland and the contemporary. These aspects have given rise to an amalgamation where one’s identity has become a product of divergent forces seeking reconciliation not only between past and present but with growing sentiments of religious doubts and otherness. Thus, this paper attempts a literary analysis for exploring these themes through his collection of short stories, comparing it with his other works, to find a closure to such unsettling stances.

Keywords

Ethnicity, identity, hybridity, cultural assimilation, transcultural

 

 

Diversity in Hybridity: A Quest for (Re)Locating the Self in Kaushik Barua’s Windhorse

DOI

Priyanka Chakraborty <c.priyanka113@gmail.com>, Banaras Hindu University

Abstract

Every ethnic group has a unique identity as an essential element of their existence – an identity which evolves anthropologically, culturally and topologically. While for the members of a diaspora community the very identity becomes further crucial for the existence and for their functioning in discrete cultural/political/social milieu of foreign countries. The notion of identity plays the pivotal role in the lives of displaced communities, as it prevents them from assimilation and acculturation. This paper on Kaushik Barua’s Windhorse would attempt to illustrate the plurality of identity present among individuals of the Tibetan diasporic community, scattered over different parts of India. The paper would also seek to throw light on its diverse manifestations, evolution, alteration and adoption. It would also aim at interrogating the role of identity, as one of the constitutive parameters of ‘nationalism’, deftly portrayed through the movement and their participation in it. The paper scrutinizes the life and experience of three young Tibetans bringing them on same temporal and spatial scale, thereby, making them interact with each other while carrying forward their own personal as well as cultural paraphernalia.

Keywords

Tibetan-ness, identity, hybridity, plurality, nation

 

 

The Archive as a Transcultural Contact Zone in Amitav Ghosh’s The Calcutta Chromosome

DOI

Rahul Basu <rhlbasu86@gmail.com>, The University of Burdwan

Abstract

The archive as a metaphor emerges as a contentious zone in Amitav Ghosh’s The Calcutta Chromosome. Not only does the plot of the novel revolve around several archival researches, but the negotiation of the archive becomes a post-colonial strategy of coming to terms with the history of colonial medical science. The novel intervenes and challenges the hegemonizing attempt of the pedagogical grand narratives of history, science and other forms of ‘objective’ disciplines to reveal the performative micronarratives – the ‘different’ stories, ‘different’ experiences, and ‘different’ histories. The archive becomes a potent metaphor of transculturalism itself in that it turns out to be a fluid and volatile space which not only stores textual traces but also creates the texts. Renegotiation of the archive by subaltern agencies, therefore, sets the archive perpetually in motion and reveals it as open to further change and reinscription. The Calcutta Chromosome delineates a post-colonial archival research which leads the researcher to the discovery of a counter-archive of indigenous, esoteric knowledge, posited as an epistemic ‘other’ to the colonial archive of scientific discourse.

Keywords

Amitav Ghosh, transculturalism, archive, subaltern, colonial science

 

 

Women in Transcultural Space: A Study of Meena Alexander’s Fault Lines and Sara Suleri’s Meatless Days

DOI

Shrabanti Kundu <shrabantikundu.27@gmail.com>, Central University of Gujarat

Abstract

This paper focuses on the transcultural experience of women. It attempts to understand, analyse and trace the condition of woman migrants in different spaces and their assertion of such, accounting not only that phase of their life but the whole life itself. Narrating the construction of self in life writing, in regard of both utilising and despising transcultural space, is modelled in the study through the analysis of two autobiographies, Fault Lines and Meatless Days by Meena Alexander and Sara Suleri respectively. Diaspora studies usually locate the dilemma of place, citizenship, language, culture but in recent studies the gender constrains have been added to this problem of positionality. Therefore, the study has tried to present the woman’s self-representation, migration and displacement and the development or construction of self of women and identity in a new country. Moreover, for this purpose, autobiography has provided a concrete ground where women themselves articulate their story or life journey with all their struggles. Through this articulation of ‘self’, women break the specific gender roles, and create space for self-representation and deny all kinds of restrictions.

Keywords

Transcultural space, self, migration, identity

 

 

Transnational Organized Crime, Islamophobia and Globalization in Mohsin Hamid’s The Reluctant Fundamentalist: Contentions and Contestations

DOI

Abhisek Ghosal <abhisekghosal419@gmail.com>, The University of Burdwan

Abstract

9/11 terror strike had wrecked havoc on the cultural, political, economic, religious, to name only a few, configurations in America thereby disconcerting social status quo at large. Before the demolition of twin tower in America, a marker of economic condescension of America upon the rest of the world, America had resorted to a number of politico-economic ploys to invite skilled workers in America intending to chisel the steady prosperity of America in the domains of commerce and education. For instance, America, intently, used to cater scholarships to impoverished yet brilliant students, across the world, to study in premier academic institutions in America inasmuch as they had planned to employ unswerving and unwavering youths to build up the future of America. In addition to it, the emergence of Multinational Companies was triggered into action in 1980s onwards to open up the economy of America so as to make lucrative gains from all over the world. These MNCs tactfully recruit local youths to extract and exact maximum labour possible at the expense of minimum salary. Before 9/11, America began to emerge as mighty economic power in the domain of commerce. 9/11 terror strike unsettled America’s steady rise in the global market, and most importantly, called neoliberal fiscal policies into question. In post-9/11 scenario, non-Muslim native residents of America turned violent against Muslims, for the demolition of twin tower was devised and carried out by Al Qaeda, a Muslim terrorist outfit. Naïve Muslims living in America were made subject to humiliations, tortures, torments, misery, among others, perpetrated by infuriated non-Muslim natives who became intolerant to Muslims particularly after the 9/11 terror strike. Pitted against this political upheaval in America, induced by sudden slumps in economy, Mohsin Hamid, one of the most brilliant novelists of twenty first century of Pakistan, has posited the poignant tale of Changez, the protagonist of The Reluctant Fundamentalist, against the backdrop of 9/11 terror strike and its concomitant consequences. Debunked and disillusioned, shattered and battered, Changez engages himself in a conversation with an unknown American at Lahore café and unfolds his harrowing experiences of four and a half years stint in America. Hamid is supposed to have penned down this novel to project the contentious intersections and interactions among transnational organized crime, Islamophobia and globalization. This article is devised to investigate the interplay among the trio, taking recourse to pertinent theoretical insights into cognizance, and to interrogate Hamid’s interventions into the problematic overlapping of the trio.

Keywords

Islamophobia, transnational organized crime, globalization; victim; 9/11 terror strike

 

 

The Manifestation of Cultural Identity and Transculturation in D.H. Lawrence’s Mornings in Mexico

DOI

Soumitra Mukherjee <smukherjee453@gmail.com>, Seacom Skills University

Abstract

This paper deals with the issues of cultural identity and transcultural spaces in the travel writing of D. H. Lawrence. The travel writings of Lawrence are important analyses of modern culture. They definitely give opportunity to study the role of cultural identity in the genre of travel writing. Travel writing as a genre primarily deals with the experiences of a travel writer travelling to different unknown cultures or places and most of the travel writings of Lawrence document the meeting of two alien cultures. The strange meetings represented by the travel writer’s own culture and the culture of the people of the country travelled by him make a transcultural space. The strangeness produced out of the encounter of two different cultures is the most important issue here. The strangeness between the self and the world brings with it the issues of ‘cultural identity’ and ‘transculturation’. Lawrence’s Mexican travel writing, Mornings in Mexico (1927) is built on the notion of cultural identity. His encounter with the Mexicans reminds of the vast gulf of difference between his European culture and the native Mexican culture. As transculturation is a transition from one culture to another, Lawrence’s encounter with the Mexican culture definitely produces a transcultural space that is only translated through the strangeness existing between the two cultures.

Keywords

D. H. Lawrence, travel writing, identity, cultural identity, transculturation

 

Book Review

 

Transnational Women in India

A Review of Indian Videshinis: European Women in India

Dr Ian H. Magedera

DOI

Review by

Swati Dasgupta <32swati@gmail.com>, University of Delhi

 

 

 

Creative Commons Licence
The works published here are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.